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How to Help Fellow Nurses You Suspect Have a Substance Use Disorder

Nurses are charged with many duties during the course of the day that pertains directly to patient care. Suspected substance use disorders are a serious problem that needs to be addressed right away. There is drug rehab for nurses that specialize in treating this problem.

Addictions and Nursing

Nurses often are charged with dispensing all types of addictive prescription medications to patients. The temptation is great to pilfer some of the medicines and use. The reasons this behavior begins vary but it’s not an uncommon problem. Substance abuse disorder in nursing is found in every type of clinic, hospital, and facility that exists. An intervention will have to be staged in order to stop the behavior and to get the nurse the help and treatment they need.

The Changing Culture and Response to Nursing SUD

In years past, if a nurse was found to be using the drugs they were meant to give out to patients, it generally meant being fired. Little thought was given to getting them the help they need to recover from a developed addiction. It’s more common now to find employers placing their nurses in treatment and working with them to rehabilitate. It’s required that you turn in any suspected SUD case to your supervisor so that the available help can be offered.

Signs of Nursing SUD

A few signs that your colleague might have a substance use disorder is missing medications, patients not receiving full doses, or your nurse colleague exhibiting signs of substance intoxication. Other signs can be changed in moods, aloofness, or any sudden change in personality that was not present before.

When SUD Jeopardizes Patient Care

Nursing is a demanding field that requires much of the individuals taking care of patients. You need to be at your best at all times. Having a colleague that is offering services while intoxicated or in any way impaired is dangerous for the patient. It’s only right to turn this behavior in for the protection of those individuals they are supposed to be helping.

Report the Suspected SUD

You are obligated to report any case of suspected substance use disorder to your supervisor for review. Have as many details handy as possible so that it makes their job easier. It’s best to not approach and accuse the person. Take your suspicions to the supervisor and allow them to handle it the way it is set up at your place of employment. All businesses that offer nursing care have programs designed to assist in these types of situations.

Intervening and Saving a Career

The investment made by the nurse of time, education, and desire to become a nurse is tremendous. The employer has also invested a great deal of time and money in hiring the nurse. It would be a shame to let all that commitment and money go down the drain over an addiction without trying to get the problem fixed.

Specialized Treatment for Nursing Professionals

Treatment at a drug rehab for nurses is a way to give them the specialized services that center on nurse-related substance use and abuse. Everything from medical detox to therapy and ongoing support is offered. It gives your colleague the opportunity to step away from the profession and take care of their problems in a relaxing setting. The non-judgemental approach can save a career and a life.

Monitored and Supervised Return to Duty

Once drug treatment is successfully completed, the nurse can return back to duty in a supervised and monitored way. Care is taken to ensure that the problems do not return. Not every nurse is able to conquer the problem the first time around, but it gives many a chance to salvage their careers.

Working Towards Complete Recovery

Complete recovery takes time and continued aftercare support. The desire of the nurse to get better is half of the battle. Te kinder approach to addiction and treatment is making a difference in the nursing field. Many former addicts are back working with no repeat problems.

Nursingis a stressful occupation that can see an occasional case of substance use disorder. Early intervention and treatment can bring these nurses back and sed them on the road to recovery. It saves the future of the nurse and the career.

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